9/11 Never Forget – Victims, Heroes, reflections. Good vs Evil and Radical Islam vs the Rest of the World!

Posted on September 11, 2012


9-11 A solemn yet Resolute day – Remember and Never Forget: Reflections, many articles…

9-11 A solemn yet Resolute day – Remember and Never Forget: Reflections, many articles…[ Please be sure to see at (bottom of page, only because it’s a very long post) September 11 and the global jihad rages on: Death toll climbs, the names of our fallen heroes ]  September 11, 2012 On this and every 9-11, We remember, and We will never forget. God Bless America-Land that we … Continue reading »

9-11 In loving memory of victims, In loving honor of heroes.

September 11,2012 by  DANIEL  GREENFIELD
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Read more: Family Security Matters http://www.familysecuritymatters.org/#ixzz26Cp4j3DY Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

God Bless You All, and may God continue to Bless America.

9-11 Messages from NY

On This Somber Day, We Stand Tall For Peace And Freedom

Mitt Romney | September 11, 2012
romney-2012-blog-image-gov-9-11.jpg

Eleven years ago, evil descended upon our country, taking thousands of lives in an unspeakable attack against innocents. America will never forget those who perished.  America will never stop caring for the loved ones they left behind. And America shall remain ever vigilant against those who would do us harm. Today we again extend our most profound gratitude to our brave troops who have gone into battle, some never to return, so that we may live in peace. On this most somber day, those who would attack us should know that we are united, one nation under God, in our determination to stop them and to stand tall for peace and freedom at home and across the world.

 

Statement from Wendy Long:

“On September 11, 2001 America was attacked, not for what we do wrong – but for what we do right.  We were attacked by those who despise the freedoms that are enshrined in our Constitution; freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to assemble, and the freedom to petition our government. Eleven years later, young American men and women are fighting and dying to protect those freedoms around the world. Today, as we remember the heroes lost on September 11, 2001, let us pause to reflect on those freedoms and honor those who have died in its name and those who protect them today.”

– U.S. Senate Candidate Wendy Long, R-NY

 

Statement from Congressman Tom Reed on the 11th Anniversary of the September 11 Attacks

“Millions of Americans will pause today as we solemnly recall September 11. We will never forget the bravery and selfless sacrifice that occurred both on that day and in the days that immediately followed.  We must always honor all of the civilians, emergency responders and those in our military who fell the day of those horrific attacks and in the years which have passed since then. As we do so, we might also reflect upon our American way of life; our democracy which stands for freedom and our firm belief that people can govern themselves through free exchange of ideas and respect for one another.  We do not bend to those who rule by repression, violence and fear, and that will never change.”

NY GOP: Remembering 9/11, Eleven Years Later

Today, at formal ceremonies and in private moments across our Nation, Americans will pause to remember the tragic events of a beautiful September morning eleven years ago when four planes were hijacked and used in attacks against the Unites States.

Today we remember the 2,977 innocent lives that were taken on September 11, 2001.

Today we remember the Police Officers, and other First Responders who ran into the burning Twin Towers to save people they had never met.

Today we remember the brave men and women, uniformed and civilian, whose lives were lost performing their duties at the Pentagon.

Today we remember the passengers of United 93, who saved lives on the ground and perhaps the White House or Capitol Building: their individual and collective acts of heroism will never be forgotten.

Today we recognize all of the men and women of our armed forces and their families for the sacrifices they have made and continue to make defending our freedom and this great country.

We will never forget the mothers, fathers, sons and daughters who never made it home that day, innocent victims of a hateful and barbaric attack on our country.

To all of the families of those who have perished, you are in our thoughts and prayers always, but especially on this difficult day.

God Bless the United States of America.

911 we remember

A message from Massachusetts:

Dear Fellow American, Today marks 11 years since our nation was attacked in the name of radical Islam. We have made much progress in countering the threat posed by those who would do us harm, as evidenced by the death of Osama Bin Laden among many others. However, America still faces serious dangers that our leaders must not ignore. I served as a U.S. Marine officer on active duty for four years and in the Marine Reserve for ten years now. In addition to my military service, I led a successful $100 million product line of counter-IED defense robots that help disarm roadside bombs for our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan and earned a Master’s in Public Policy with a focus in International Security at Harvard. My experience has contributed to my belief that we need to keep the U.S. strong and secure. Unfortunately, the Obama Administration has failed to adequately address the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran and showed great reluctance to support Israel in her efforts to do so. The Administration has also failed to provide strategic leadership for our presence in Afghanistan and support our ongoing combat capability and the work of our human intelligence community. It is my concern for our national security as well as our economic prosperity that has compelled me to run for U.S. Congress in the Fourth District of Massachusetts. I’m the father of two young children, and I worry about their future. I’m not only concerned about our runaway spending, but I’m alarmed at the external threats to this country. Eleven years after September 11, are we maintaining our vigilance? Do we have a strategic vision for how to maintain U.S. national security in the years to come and with the fiscal challenges we face? I’m afraid the answer is no. Having worked in national security—both as a Marine and a private sector consultant—I understand the need to implement policies that not only protect our interests abroad, but address issues of border and port security, as well as immigration.  I also understand that our country’s future depends on electing leaders who are willing to address these issues. Americans face a critical decision this November: who can best lead us out of the current economic slump while remaining ever focused on our security? It isn’t enough to elect a President who will address these issues; we need to elect a U.S. Congress who will hold him accountable on behalf of the American people.  This Election Day, we need to send men and women to Washington who have national security experience as well as an understanding of how to grow jobs. Today we all remember those who sacrificed their lives on September 11, 2001 and the eleven years since.  With America’s future in our hands this November, we must ensure that this sort of tragedy never occurs again.  If you’d like to join my effort to address these important issues, please visit my website to learn more about my views and what I will do if elected to Congress. Sincerely,  

Sean Bielat Candidate for Congress Massachusetts 4th District

9/11 and a Shining City

Alan Sears    Sep 11,  2012

9/11 and a Shining City

On September 11, 2001, Americans were reminded of two things—the dangers of terrorism and the greatness of the United States.

The dangers of terrorism were evident in the phone calls various passengers made to their loved ones when they realized the very planes aboard which they were flying had been hijacked. The dangers were also evident in the twisted and smoking remains of the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon, and a field in rural Pennsylvania.

In all these places, American lives were lost—nearly 3,000 in all—and the United States momentarily appeared vulnerable, if not weak.

But a strange thing happened on the way to cowering and surrendering in the days that followed the attacks: namely, Americans of almost all political stripes united and a sleeping giant was awakened for a time.

We went from staring at our televisions in disbelief to uniting on our core beliefs and sending our military to find those who had committed these acts against us.

This focus was exemplified by President George W. Bush in his famous bullhorn speech delivered on the rubble of the World Trade Center, just days after the attack: “I can hear you, the rest of the world hears you, and the people who knocked these buildings down will hear from all of us soon.”

In this, the greatness of the United States was shining through. And the world could see that terrorists might knock down our buildings and steal the lives of thousands of our citizens, yet they could not steal our ideals or our love for country.

America has always rested on something greater than the differences that exist between her various citizens, something which transcends the diversity of each particular generation, allowing them to shake hands across the decades: thus the motto, E Pluribus unum.

We forget this so easily that it took an unprecedented attack on our homeland in 2001 to remind us it’s true.

On this eleventh anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks, we need to remember the Americans we lost—the fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, and sons and daughters who perished aboard hijacked planes, or climbing stairwells in the World Trade Center, or sitting at their desks at the Pentagon. Yet as we remember these, we must also remember that America’s greatness, recovered for a time amidst the smoldering rubble, is not a thing of the past.

We need to search out again the aspects of our tangible foundation which transcend our personal or political differences, and upon finding them we need to cling to them tightly.

9-11: A Day of Reflection and Prayer

It’s been eleven years since terrorists attacked the United States on September 11, 2001, and the lessons have not been forgotten. In the intervening years, the United States’ foreign and domestic security policy has been revamped and improved, and we have not suffered another attack on American soil.

President George W. Bush’s words to a joint session of Congress mere days after the atrocities echo with a message of vigilince, tolerance and thoughtfulness. I will excerpt them here, but highly recommend reading them in full.

On September the 11th, enemies of freedom committed an act of war against our country. Americans have known wars — but for the past 136 years, they have been wars on foreign soil, except for one Sunday in 1941. Americans have known the casualties of war — but not at the center of a great city on a peaceful morning. Americans have known surprise attacks — but never before on thousands of civilians. All of this was brought upon us in a single day — and night fell on a different world, a world where freedom itself is under attack. Americans have many questions tonight. Americans are asking: Who attacked our country? The evidence we have gathered all points to a collection of loosely affiliated terrorist organizations known as al Qaeda. They are some of the murderers indicted for bombing American embassies in Tanzania and Kenya, and responsible for bombing the USS Cole. Al Qaeda is to terror what the mafia is to crime. But its goal is not making money; its goal is remaking the world — and imposing its radical beliefs on people everywhere.

Continue Reading on townhall.com

NY Times Marks 9/11 Anniversary By Blaming Attacks On George W. Bush

Shameless.

The Deafness Before the Storm — NYT

IT was perhaps the most famous presidential briefing in history.

On Aug. 6, 2001, President George W. Bush received a classified review of the threats posed by Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network, Al Qaeda. That morning’s “presidential daily brief” — the top-secret document prepared by America’s intelligence agencies — featured the now-infamous heading: “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.” A few weeks later, on 9/11, Al Qaeda accomplished that goal.

On April 10, 2004, the Bush White House declassified that daily brief — and only that daily brief — in response to pressure from the 9/11 Commission, which was investigating the events leading to the attack. Administration officials dismissed the document’s significance, saying that, despite the jaw-dropping headline, it was only an assessment of Al Qaeda’s history, not a warning of the impending attack. While some critics considered that claim absurd, a close reading of the brief showed that the argument had some validity.

Continue Reading on weaselzippers.us

BUSH: 'One of the lessons of 9-11 is that evil is real, and so is courage'

How the Lord’s Prayer saved a 9/11 survivor

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‘Meet Me in the Stairwell’ – 9/11 Tribute

TPN Blog post added by Kasey Jachim: Posted on September 10, 2012 by Kasey Jachim Reply I received this shortly after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack on our country and read it…

The Spirit of 9/11 Call for a Change in Washington

TPN Blog post added by J. Andrew Reid: Americans came together on 9/11 because we were all attacked. The World Trade Center and Pentagon were bastions of western civilization and…

9/11′s Aftermath of Lethal Tolerance

TPN Blog post added by Alan Caruba: By Alan Caruba The one thing I have never understood is the way Americans seem to refuse to accept the fact that the worst attack on the ho…

Getting Over 9/11

By Mark Tapson

Behind the “Day of Service” rebranding of the fateful day. Read more »

All the Wrong  9/11 Lessons

by MICHELLE  MALKIN

Eleven years after Osama bin Laden’s henchmen murdered thousands of innocents  on American soil, too many children have been spoon-fed the thin gruel of  progressive political correctness over the stiff antidote of truth.

Eleven  Years after 9/11, the Threat Remains: The Leading Al Qaeda Operative Remains at  Large (Part I)

by PAUL  L. WILLIAMS, PHD

FBI Director Robert Mueller and former AG John Ashcroft have called Adnan  el-Shukrijumah “the next Mohammed Atta” – – a nuclear technician and computer  scientist, who represents “a clear and imminent danger to all  Americans.”

D+ Report  Card on the 9/11 Commission’s  Recommendations

by PETER  GADIEL, PATRICK  DUNLEAVY

9/11 Families for a Secure America Foundation, in conjunction with Family  Security Matters, has issued a report card on the 9/11 commission’s  recommendations.

 

9/11 Still Resonates for Some Recruits

Sep 11, 2012             Military.com|            by Richard Sisk

Eleven years after the 9/11 attacks, all four service branches are meeting their recruitment goals. Some join up to serve the country at war, others for economic reasons.

When the planes hit the World Trade Center, Caitlin Stubbs of Sergeantsville, N.J. was a 6-year-old on vacation with with her family in California.

She remembers that her parents wouldn’t let her watch the TV, and she remembers learning later that her father would have been on business in one of the Twin Towers if not for the California trip.

The memory of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, that killed 2,753 in Lower Manhattan, 184 at the Pentagon, and 40 in Shanksville, Pa., may have faded as a motivating factor for young people thinking of joining the military. But for Stubbs, it’s still personal.

more…

Remembering 9/11 in a Volatile World

Heritage – Morning Bell 09/11/12

Eleven years ago today, terrorists shattered America’s sense of safety. Generations who did not remember Pearl Harbor suddenly knew the shock of an attack on U.S. soil.

Brothers, fathers, cousins, wives, and daughters were lost. And more sisters, mothers, husbands and sons would give their lives in the years that followed as they fearlessly joined the fight against terrorism around the world.

Because of the sacrifices of our men and women in uniform—and the hours put in scanning intelligence documents and patrolling the streets by our servants here at home—America has thus far avoided another 9/11. Since that day, at least 51 terrorist plots against the country (that we know of) have been foiled. Terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden has been eliminated.

But as the U.S. withdraws from Iraq and Afghanistan, the world is not becoming a safer place.

Pakistan continues to serve as a safe haven for terrorist groups such as Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Taliban, and the Haqqani network, threatening to jeopardize everything the U.S. has fought for in Afghanistan since 9/11.

In a new Issue Brief taking stock of the war on terrorism, Heritage security experts Michaela Bendikova, Lisa Curtis, and Jessica Zuckerman warn:

[T]he U.S. counterterrorism strategy remains flawed. The U.S. needs to name its enemies, maintain the nation’s commitments abroad, fully fund the military, reach out to allies, and truly defend the home front. The campaign has certainly seen its share of successes in addition to the bin Laden mission. Drone strikes have helped to disrupt al-Qaeda operations and planning. But the U.S. must concentrate simultaneously on “uprooting extremist ideologies that support terrorism, collecting information from captured terrorists, and convincing the Pakistanis to conduct joint operations that deal with the threat,” the authors write. Continued terrorist sanctuaries inside Pakistan’s borders remain a threat.

At home, we cannot combat terrorism under “a law enforcement paradigm that focuses on reactive policies and prosecuting terrorists rather than proactive efforts to enhance intelligence tools and thwart terrorist attempts long before the public is in danger,” they write. This strategy fails to recognize the true nature of the threat posed by terrorist groups (such as al-Qaeda and al-Shabaab) and state-sponsored terrorism, while thwarting terrorist travel and financing remain the most effective ways to protect the homeland.

Unfortunately, the reality is that terrorism—without the face of a particular nation—is not the only threat America faces. Iran and North Korea continue to invest in capabilities designed to kill Americans and our allies. Syria is wracked by civil war and has the potential to destabilize the entire Middle East.

If we are to meet this volatile world with a determination to protect U.S. citizens, our priorities must shift. The defense budget has already absorbed about half of all spending cuts even though it represents less than a fifth of the federal budget. If U.S. forces are weakened further, the country will be unable to maintain its superpower status.

Today, we remember those we have lost. Tomorrow, we must honor their memory by strengthening our defenses for those who do not yet know the horror of an attack at home—so that they never will.

911 SION Freedom Congress: Tommy Robinson to speak today in NY

BREAKING: Tommy Robinson in New York now to speak at our 911 World Freedom Comgress. World historic.Sionfinal poster

Posted by on Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 01:22 PM

 

September 11 and the global jihad rages on: Death toll climbs, the names of our fallen heroes

America god shed his grace I cannot communicate with my cherished and beloved readers the wrenching difficulty of assembling these posts. I don’t mean going through scores of DoD press releases searching for the names of our fallen heroes. There are very few generous and noble souls who can honor these men and women in words. I cannot. I am not that skilled, though I wish I were. Such rare souls are endowed with great intelligence and greater sensitivity, because seeing and hearing the names is not enough. You have to be able to feel the anguish of the mother whose child has been taken from her, the wife who has lost her soul, her sky, and the children, oh the sorrow of the children. Unspeakable. It is hard for people to see the individual stories without seeing the person telling their story and see through that individual the suffering of others.

Huge courage is demanded of the brothers and sisters of the fallen — brothers in arms and in life — to forge on and not falter.

There are those who can understand and those who cannot. I have long abandoned those who cannot. I speak to those who can and pray that they take up the righteous and humane cause in which we fight.

This snail mail letter came from an soldier in our Navy, some 7,000 miles from the shores of our great nation:

I am writing to you a perfect stranger from 7000 miles off the  shore of Norfolk VA in a little town called ——-.
I’m not a writer nor a political pundit or much of anything other than a —-  for the Navy .  It’s been so startling to  see the United States of America transformed to something unrecognizable that often my head is in a fog.
Thank you for the great work you do.  I will  continue to read your blog.  Sometimes it’s so overwhelming to see the  death of freedom happen right before my eyes.  I simply cannot believe  this is happening.
Be well and God bless you.
——-

September 6: Pfc. Shane W. Cantu, 20, of Corunna, Mich., died Aug. 28,  in Charkh, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he was hit by shrapnel.  Cantu was assigned to 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry  Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Caserma Ederle, Vicenza,  Italy.

September 5: Lance Cpl. Alec R. Terwiske, 21, of Dubois, Ind., died Sept. 3 while conducting  combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to  1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif.  The Marine’s parent command was Inspector/Instructor Staff, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve, Fort  Knox, Ky.

September 4: Staff Sgt. Jeremie S. Border, 28, of Mesquite, Texas,  assigned to 1st Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Torii  Station, Japan;  died in Batur Village, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms fire.

September 4: Staff Sgt. Jonathan P. Schmidt, 28, of Petersburg, Va.,  assigned to 192nd Ordnance Battalion, 52nd Ordnance Group, 20th Support  Command (CBRNE), Fort Bragg, N.C. died Sept. 1, in Batur Village, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms fire.

September 3: Spc. Kyle R. Rookey, 23, of Oswego, N.Y., died Sept. 2, in Jalalabad, Afghanistan from a non-combat related incident.  He was  assigned to the 4th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colo.

Augest 28: Staff  Sgt. Jessica M. Wing, 42, of Alexandria, Va., died Aug. 27, in Kuwait  City, Kuwait in a non-combat related incident.  She was assigned to the  1st Battalion, 126th Aviation Regiment, Bangor, Maine.

Sgt. Christopher J. Birdwell, 25, of Windsor, Colo. died Aug. 27, in Kalagush, Afghanistan, of injuries  suffered from enemy, small arms fire.  They were assigned to the 4th  Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry  Division, Fort Carson, Colo.

Spc. Mabry J. Anders, 21, of Baker City, Oregon died Aug. 27, in Kalagush, Afghanistan, of injuries  suffered from enemy, small arms fire.  They were assigned to the 4th  Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry  Division, Fort Carson, Colo.

August 26:  Pfc. Patricia L. Horne, 20, of Greenwood, Miss., died Aug.  24 in Bagram, Afghanistan.  She was assigned to the 96th Aviation  Support Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne  Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.

August 23: Sgt.  Louis R. Torres, 23, of Oberlin, Ohio, died Aug. 22, in San Antonio,  Texas, of wounds suffered when he encountered an enemy improvised  explosive device, Aug. 6, in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Torres was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry  Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, Joint Base Lewis-McChord,  Wash.

August 21: Sgt. David V. Williams, 24, of Frederick, Md., died Aug. 18, in Kandahar,  Afghanistan.  The cause of death is under investigation.  He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry  Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint  Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

August 21: Sgt. 1st Class Coater B. Debose, 55, of State Line, Miss., died Aug. 19 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan. Debose was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 351st Infantry  Regiment, 158th Infantry Brigade, 1st Army Division East, Camp Shelby,  Miss.

August 20: Chief Warrant Officer Brian D. Hornsby, 37, of Melbourne,  Fla., assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Chief Warrant Officer Suresh N. A. Krause, 29, of Cathedral City, Calif., assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment,  25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield  Barracks, Hawaii    died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Petty Officer Technician 1st  Class Sean P. Carson, 32, of Des Moines, Wash., assigned to an explosive ordnance disposal mobile unit in San Diego died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Special Warfare Operator Petty Officer 1st Class Patrick D. Feeks, 28, of Edgewater, Md., assigned to a West Coast-based naval  special warfare unit died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Sgt. Richard A. Essex, 23, of Kelseyville, Calif., assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation  Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Sgt. Luis A. Oliver Galbreath, 41, of San Juan, Puerto  Rico, assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii  died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Special Warfare Operator Petty Officer 2nd Class David J.  Warsen, 27, of Kentwood, Mich., assigned to a West Coast-based naval  Special warfare unit died Aug. 16 in a helicopter crash northeast of Kandahar, Afghanistan.

Staff Sgt. Gregory T. Copes, 36, of Lynch Station, Va.,  died  Aug. 17 while supporting combat operations in Farah province,  Afghanistan. They were assigned to 3rd Marine Special Operations  Battalion, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Hospital Corpsman Petty Officer 1st Class Darrel L. Enos, 36, of Colorado Springs, Colo.  died  Aug. 17 while supporting combat operations in Farah province,  Afghanistan. They were assigned to 3rd Marine Special Operations  Battalion, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Spc.  James A. Justice, 21, of Grover, N.C., died Aug. 17 at Landstuhl Regional  Medical Center, Germany from injuries suffered on Aug. 14 from enemy  small-arms fire in Wardak province, Afghanistan.  Justice was assigned  to the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade  Combat Team, Caserma Ederle in Vicenza, Italy.

Pfc. Michael  R. Demarsico II, of North Adams, Mass., died Aug. 16 in Panjwa’l,  Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he encountered an enemy improvised  device.  Demarsico was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry  Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, Joint Base Lewis-McChord,  Wash.

Staff Sgt. Eric S. Holman, 39, of Evans City, Penn., died Aug. 15, in Ghazni  province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he encountered an enemy  improvised explosive device.  Holman was assigned to 192nd Ordnance Battalion, 52nd Ordnance Group, 20th Support Command, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Pfc. Andrew  J. Keller, 22, of Tigard, Ore., died Aug. 15, in Charkh, Afghanistan  when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire.  He was  assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne  Brigade Combat Team, Caserma Ederle, Vicenza, Italy.

Staff Sgt. Scott E. Dickinson, 29,of San Diego, Calif., died Aug. 10 while supporting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 3rd  Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force. . The Marines’ parent command was 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine  Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.Cpl. Richard A. Rivera Jr., 20 of Ventura, Calif., died Aug. 10 while supporting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 3rd  Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force. . The Marines’ parent command was 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine  Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley, 21, of Oceanside, N.Y. died Aug. 10 while supporting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 3rd  Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force. . The Marines’ parent command was 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine  Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

Capt. Matthew P. Manoukian, 29, of Los Altos Hills, Calif., died Aug. 10 while conducting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 1st  Marine Special Operations Battalion, Camp Pendleton.

Gunnery Sgt. Ryan Jeschke, 31, of Herndon, Va.,died Aug. 10 while conducting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 1st  Marine Special Operations Battalion, Camp Pendleton.

Staff Sgt. Sky R. Mote, 27, of El Dorado, Calif. died Aug. 10 while conducting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  These Marines were assigned to 1st  Marine Special Operations Battalion, Camp Pendleton.

Master Sgt. Gregory R. Trent, 38, of Norton, Mass., died Aug. 8 in Bethesda,  Md., from wounds suffered July 31 in Baktabad, Afghanistan, when enemy  forces attacked his unit with small-arms fire. Trent was assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.

Maj. Thomas E. Kennedy, 35, of West Point, N.Y.,died Aug. 8 in Kunar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they encountered an insurgent who detonated a suicide  vest.  The  soldier was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters  Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division,

Command Sgt. Maj. Kevin J. Griffin, 45, of Laramie, Wyo. died Aug. 8 in Kunar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they encountered an insurgent who detonated a suicide  vest.  The soldier was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters  Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson,  Colo.

Spc. Ethan J. Martin, 22, of Lewiston, Idaho, died Aug. 7  in Koragay, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he encountered enemy  small-arms fire. Martin was assigned to 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Joint Base  Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Maj.  Walter D. Gray, 38, of Conyers, Ga., died Aug. 8 from injuries suffered  during a suicide bomb attack in Kunar province, Afghanistan. Gray was assigned to the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron, Fort Carson, Colo.

Maj. Walter D. Gray, 38, of Conyers, Ga., died Aug. 8 from  injuries suffered during a suicide bomb 911 imagesattack in Kunar province,  Afghanistan.  Gray was assigned to the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron, Fort  Carson, Colo.

Maj. Thomas E. Kennedy, 35, of West Point, N.Y., died Aug. 8 in Kunar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they encountered an insurgent who detonated a suicide  vest.  These soldiers were assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters  Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson,  Colo.

Command Sgt. Maj. Kevin J. Griffin, 45, of Laramie, Wyo. died Aug. 8 in Kunar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they encountered an insurgent who detonated a suicide  vest.  These soldiers were assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters  Company, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson,  Colo.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Clayton R. Beauchamp, of   Weatherford, Texas, died Aug. 7 when enemy forces attacked his unit with  an improvised explosive device while conducting a dismounted patrol in  the Shaban District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned  to  1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 6, 1st  Marine  Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), Camp  Pendleton, Calif.

Cpl. Daniel L. Linnabary II, 23, of Hubert, N.C.,  died Aug.  6 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine  Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Spc. Ethan J. Martin, 22,of Lewiston, Idaho, died Aug. 7  in Koragay, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he encountered enemy  small-arms fire. Martin was assigned to 1st  Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment,  4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne),  25th Infantry Division, Joint Base  Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.e: 1st Sgt. Russell R. Bell, 37, of Tyler, Texas died Aug. 2, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when they encountered an enemy improvised explosive  device.   These soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Staff Sgt. Matthew S. Sitton, 26, of Largo, Fla. died Aug. 2, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when they encountered an enemy improvised explosive  device.   These soldiers were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

1st Lt. Todd W. Lambka, 25, of Fraser, Mich., died  Aug. 1, in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they  encountered an enemy improvised explosive device.   These soldiers were  assigned to the 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry  Regiment, 4th Infantry  Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.Pfc. Jesus J. Lopez, 22, of San Bernardino, Calif. died  Aug. 1, in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when they  encountered an enemy improvised explosive device.   These soldiers were  assigned to the 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry  Regiment, 4th Infantry  Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.

Spc.  Kyle B. McClain, 25, of Rochester Hills,  Mich., died Aug. 1, in Salim  Aka, Afghanistan.  McClain was assigned to 1433rd Engineer Company,  507th Engineer Battalion, 177th Military  Police Brigade, Kalamazoo,  Mich

Lance Cpl.  Curtis J. Duarte, 22, of Covina, Calif., died Aug. 1, while conducting  combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to  1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment,  1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Gunnery Sgt. Jonathan W. Gifford, 34, of Palm Bay, Fla.   He was assigned to 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion, Camp  Lejeune, N.C.; died July 29 while conducting combat operations in Badghis province, Afghanistan.

Gunnery Sgt. Daniel J. Price, 27, of Holland, Mich.  He  was assigned to 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion, Camp Pendleton,  Calif. died July 29 while conducting combat operations in Badghis province, Afghanistan.

Sgt. 1st Class Bobby L. Estle, 38,of Lebanon, Ohio, died July 28 in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered from enemy, small arms fire.  These soldiers were  assigned to  the 630th Engineer Company, 7th Engineer Battalion, 10th  Sustainment  Brigade, Fort Drum, N.Y. Pfc. Jose Oscar Belmontes, 28, of La Verne, Calif. died July 28 in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered from enemy, small arms fire.  These soldiers were  assigned to  the 630th Engineer Company, 7th Engineer Battalion, 10th  Sustainment  Brigade, Fort Drum, N.Y.

Pfc.  Theodore M. Glende, 23, of Rochester, N.Y.,  died  July 27, in Kharwar,  Logar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered  when enemy forces  attacked his unit with small-arms fire.    Glende was  assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry  Regiment, 173rd Airborne  Brigade Combat Team, Vicenza, Italy.

st Lt. Sean R. Jacobs, 23, of Redding, Calif.  died July 26 in Khakrez, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when  they  encountered an enemy improvised explosive device.  These soldiers  were  assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 17th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd  Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base   Lewis-McChord, Wash.Sgt. John E. Hansen, 41, of Austin, Texas died July 26 in Khakrez, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when  they  encountered an enemy improvised explosive device.  These soldiers  were  assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 17th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd  Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base   Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Spc. Benjamin C. Pleitez, 25, of Turlock, Calif., died July 27, in Mazar E Sharif, Afghanistan. Pleitez was assigned to 1072nd Transportation Company,  746th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 224th Sustainment Brigade,  Van Nuys, Calif.

Sgt. Justin M. Hansen, 26, of Traverse City, Mich., died  July 24 while conducting combat operations in Badghis  province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 2nd Marine Special  Operations  Battalion, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Pfc. Adam C. Ross, 19, of Lyman, S.C.,  died July 24, in  Wardak province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when  he encountered  small arms fire. Ross was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry  Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Vicenza, Italy.

Sgt. Eric E. Williams, 27, of Murrieta, Calif., died July 23, in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan.

Spc. Justin L. Horsley, 21, of Palm Bay, Fla., They died July 22 of wounds suffered when enemy forces  attacked  their unit in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, with an improvised  explosive  device.  They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd  Infantry  Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Caserma Ederle,  Italy.Pfc. Brenden N. Salazar, 20, of Chuluota, Fla. They died July 22 of wounds suffered when enemy forces  attacked  their unit in Pul-E Alam, Afghanistan, with an improvised  explosive  device.  They were assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd  Infantry  Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Caserma Ederle,  Italy.

Pfc. Julian L. Colvin, 21, of Birmingham, Ala., They died  July 22 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered from  an enemy  improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the 508th  Special  Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne  Division, Fort  Bragg, N.C.

Staff Sgt. Richard L. Berry, 27, of Scottsdale, Ariz. They died  July 22 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered from  an enemy  improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the 508th  Special  Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne  Division, Fort  Bragg, N.C.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael J. Brodsky, 33, of Tamarac,  Fla., died July 21 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Landstuhl,  Germany, of injuries sustained July 7 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan,  related to a  dismounted improvised explosive device blast.  He was  assigned to Navy  Region Southwest Security Detachment, San Diego.

Staff Sgt. Brandon R. Pepper, 31, of  York, Pa., died July 21, in Ghazni province, Afghanistan.  Pepper was  assigned to the 4th Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group, Fort Bragg,  N.C.

Spc.  Darrion T. Hicks, 21, of Raleigh, N.C., died July 19 in Ghazni,  Afghanistan, from injuries sustained from an enemy improvised explosive  device.  He was assigned  to the 54th Engineer Battalion, 18th Engineer  Brigade, 21st Theater  Sustainment Command, Bamberg, Germany.

Pfc.  Jeffrey L. Rice, 24, of Troy,  Ohio, died July 19, in Kandahar,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to the  20th Engineer Battalion, 36th  Engineer Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas.

Spc. Krystal  M. Fitts, 26, of Houston,  Texas, died July 17 in Kandahar, Afghanistan,  from injuries suffered  from indirect fire.  She was assigned to the 1st  Battalion, 508th  Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team,  82nd Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Cpl. Joshua  R. Ashley, 23, of Rancho  Cucamonga, Calif., died July 19 while  conducting combat operations in  Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was  assigned to 2nd Law Enforcement  Battalion, II Marine Expeditionary  Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Sgt. Daniel A. Rodriguez, 28, of Baltimore, Md., died  July 18, in Ghazni City, Afghanistan, when their vehicle  was struck by  an enemy improvised explosive device.  The soldier was  assigned to the  548th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 10th  Sustainment Brigade,  10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.

Sgt. Jose J. Reyes, 24, San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico died  July 18, in Ghazni City, Afghanistan, when their vehicle  was struck by  an enemy improvised explosive device.  The soldier was  assigned to the  548th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 10th  Sustainment Brigade,  10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.

Spc. Sergio E. Perez Jr., 21, of Crown Point, Ind., died July 16, in Wali Kot District, Afghanistan, from  injuries  suffered when their vehicle was struck by enemy rocket  propelled  grenades.  The soldier was assigned to the 81st Troop  Command,  Indiana National Guard, Indianapolis, Ind

Spc. Nicholas A. Taylor, 20, of Berne, Ind. died July 16, in Wali Kot District, Afghanistan, from  injuries  suffered when their vehicle was struck by enemy rocket  propelled  grenades.  The soldier was assigned to the 81st Troop  Command,  Indiana National Guard, Indianapolis, Ind

Sgt. Erik N. May, 26, of Independence,  Kan., died July 14, in Ghazni province, Afghanistan. May was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment,  4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st  Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.

Staff Sgt.  Carl E. Hammar, 24, of Lake  Havasu City, Ariz., died July 14, in Khost  province, Afghanistan, of  wounds suffered from enemy small arms fire. Hammar was assigned to 1st  Battalion, 501st Infantry  Regiment, 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team,  25th Infantry Division,  Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Sgt.  Michael E. Ristau, 25, of Rockford,  Ill., died July 13 in Qalat, Zabul  province, Afghanistan, of wounds  sustained when his vehicle was attacked  with an enemy improvised  explosive device.

Spc.  Sterling W. Wyatt, 21, of Columbia,  Mo., died July 11, in Kandahar  province, Afghanistan, of wounds  sustained when his vehicle was attacked  with an enemy improvised  explosive device.Wyatt was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry  Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint  Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Staff Sgt. Ricardo Seija, 31, of Tampa, Fla., died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  He was assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas. Spc. Erica P. Alecksen, 21, of Eatonton, Ga.,  died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  He was  assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Spc. Clarence Williams III, 23, of Brooksville, Fla., died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  They were assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Pfc. Trevor B. Adkins, 21, of Spring Lake, N.C., died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  He was assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas.

]Pfc. Alejandro J. Pardo, 21, of Porterville, Calif., died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  He was assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Pfc. Cameron J. Stambaugh, 20, of Spring Grove, Pa. died July 8, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked  their  unit in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, with an  improvised  explosive device.  He was assigned to the 978th Military  Police  Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Spc. Jonathan Batista, 22, of Kinnelon, N.J., died July 8,  in Zharay, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, when  enemy forces attacked  his unit with small arms fire.  He was assigned  to the 2nd Battalion,  321st Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 4th  Brigade Combat Team, 82nd  Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Staff Sgt. Raul M. Guerra, 37, of Union  City, N.J., died July 4, in Spin Boldak, Afghanistan.   Guerra was  assigned to the 502nd Military Intelligence  Battalion, 201st  Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, Joint Base  Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Capt. Bruce A. MacFarlane, 46, of  Oviedo, Florida, died July 6, in Kandahar, Afghanistan. MacFarlane was  assigned to the 1186th Transportation Company, 831st Transportation  Battalion, Jacksonville, Fla.

1st Lt. Stephen C. Prasnicki, 24, of   Lexington, Va.,  assigned to 4th Battalion, 319th Airborne Field   Artillery Regiment,  173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, Warner   Barracks, Bamberg, Germany, died  June 27, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with an   improvised  explosive device.

Sgt. James L. Skalberg Jr., 25, of   Cullman, Ala., assigned  to 4th Battalion, 1st Field Artillery Regiment,  3rd Brigade Combat Team,  1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas. died  June 27, in Maidan Shahr, Wardak province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their vehicle with an   improvised  explosive device.

Staff Sgt.  Matthew J. Leach, 29, of  Ferndale, Mich., died June 26, in Kandahar,  Afghanistan.  He was   assigned to the 1/334th Regiment, 1st Brigade,  104th Training Division  (Leader Training), Fraser, Mich.

Staff Sgt. Robert A. Massarelli, 32, of Hamilton, Ohio,  died  June 24, in Kandahar, Afghanistan.  They were assigned to  the 96th  Transportation Company, 180th Transportation Battalion, 4th  Sustainment  Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort  Hood, Texas.Sgt. Michael J. Strachota, 28, of White Hall, Ark.  died  June 24, in Kandahar, Afghanistan.  They were assigned to  the 96th  Transportation Company, 180th Transportation Battalion, 4th  Sustainment  Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort  Hood, Texas.

Lance Cpl.  Niall W. Coti-Sears, 23, of Arlington,  Va., died June 23 while  conducting combat operations in Helmand  province, Afghanistan.  He was  assigned to 1st Battalion, 7th Marine  Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I  Marine Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Lance Cpl.  Hunter D. Hogan, 21, of Norman, Ind.,  died June 23 while conducting  combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to  1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment,  2nd Marine Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Pfc. Steven  P. Stevens II, 23, of Tallahassee,  Fla., died June 22 while conducting  combat operations in Helmand  province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to  1st Combat Engineer  Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp  Pendleton, Calif.

Maj. Paul C.  Voelke, 36, of Monroe, N.Y., died Jun. 22 in Mazar E. Sharif,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to the 1st  Battalion, 30th Infantry  Regiment, 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd  Infantry Division, Fort  Stewart, Ga.

Lance Cpl.  Eugene C. Mills III, 21, of Laurel, Md., died June 22 while conducting  combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan. He was assigned to  1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

1st Lt. Ryan D. Rawl, 30,Lexington, S.C.,  died  June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when enemy  forces attacked their unit with small arms fire and an improvised  explosive device.  They were assigned to the 133rd  Military Police  Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence, S.C. Sgt. 1st Class Matthew B. Thomas, 30, Travelers Rest, S.C., died  June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when enemy  forces attacked their unit with small arms fire and an improvised  explosive device.  They were assigned to the 133rd  Military Police  Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence, S.C.

Spc. John D. Meador II, 36, Columbia, S.C. died  June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when enemy  forces attacked their unit with small arms fire and an improvised  explosive device.  They were assigned to the 133rd  Military Police  Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence, S.C.

Sgt. Jose  Rodriguez, 22, of Gustine, Calif., died June 19, in Kandahar province,  Afghanistan, of wounds suffered from enemy, small arms fire. Rodriquez was assigned to the 4th Battalion, 23rd  Infantry  Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry  Division, Joint  Base Lewis-McChord, Wash

1st Lt. Ryan D. Rawl, 30, Lexington, S.C., died June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms  fire and an improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the  133rd  Military Police Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence,  S.C.

Sgt. 1st Class Matthew B. Thomas, 30, Travelers Rest, S.C., died June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms  fire and an improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the  133rd  Military Police Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence,  S.C.

Spc. John D. Meador II, 36, Columbia, S.C.  died June 20, in Khowst province, Afghanistan, of  wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms  fire and an improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the  133rd  Military Police Company, 51st Military Police Battalion, Florence,  S.C.

Sgt. Nicholas  C. Fredsti, 30, of San Diego, Calif., died June 15, in Spedar,  Afghanistan, when insurgents attacked his  unit with small arms fire.  He  was assigned to 1st Battalion, 504th  Parachute Infantry Regiment, 1st  Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Sgt. Joseph M. Lilly, 25, of Flint, Mich., who died June 14,They died  in Panjwa`l, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when  insurgents attacked their unit with an improvised  explosive device.   They were assigned to the 18th Engineer Company, 1st Battalion, 37th  Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat  Team, 2nd Infantry  Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Spc. Trevor A. Pinnick, 20, of Lawrenceville, Ill., who died June 12,in Panjwa`l, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when  insurgents attacked their unit with an improvised  explosive device.   They were assigned to the 18th Engineer Company, 1st Battalion, 37th  Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat  Team, 2nd Infantry  Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Master Chief Petty Officer Richard J. Kessler Jr., 47, of Gulfport, Fla., died  in Panjwa`l, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when  insurgents attacked their unit with an improvised  explosive device.   They were assigned to the 18th Engineer Company, 1st Battalion, 37th  Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat  Team, 2nd Infantry  Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Sgt. 1st  Class Barett W. McNabb, 33, of Chino Valley, Ariz., died June 12, in  Khakrez, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when he was attacked by an  enemy improvised explosive device.  McNabb was assigned to the 562nd Engineer Company, 2nd  Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base  Lewis-McChord, Wash

Cpl. Taylor  J. Baune, 21, of Andover, Minn., died  June 13 while conducting combat  operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 1st  Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment,  1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Twentynine Palms,  Calif.

Spc.  Bryant J. Luxmore, 25, New Windsor, Ill., died June 10, in Panjwai,  Afghanistan, of injuries suffered when he  encountered enemy, small arms  fire.Luxmore was assigned to the 1st  Battalion, 64th Armor  Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry  Division, Fort Stewart

Pfc. Nathan  T. Davis, 20, Yucaipa, Calif., died  June 9, in Tore Obeh, Afghanistan,  of injuries suffered when his  vehicle was attacked with an enemy  improvised explosive device. Davis  was assigned to the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st  Infantry Regiment,  4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry  Division, Joint Base  Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Pfc. Brandon  D. Goodine, 20, of Luthersville, Ga.,  died June 7 in Maiwand,  Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when enemy  forces attacked his unit  with an improvised explosive device.  He was  assigned to the 4th  Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Cpl. Anthony  R. Servin, 22, of Moreno Valley,  Calif., died June 8 while conducting  combat operations in Helmand  province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to  2nd Battalion, 5th Marine  Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp  Pendleton, Calif.

  Capt. Scott P. Pace, 33,of Brawley, Calif.,  died June 6, in Qarah Bagh, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered  when their helicopter crashed.  They were assigned to the 1st  Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 82nd  Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.1st Lt. Mathew G. Fazzari, 25, of Walla Walla, Wash.  died June 6, in Qarah Bagh, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered  when their helicopter crashed.  They were assigned to the 1st  Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 82nd  Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Pfc.  Vincent J. Ellis, 22, of Tokyo, Japan, died  June 4, in Landstuhl,  Germany, from wounds suffered June 1, on Forward  Operating Base Salerno,  Afghanistan, when enemy forces attacked his  unit with improvised  explosive devices and small arms fire.  He was  assigned to the 1st  Squadron, 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Airborne  Brigade Combat Team, 25th  Infantry Division, Joint Base  Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Spc. Gerardo  Campos, 23, of Miami, Fla., died June 2 in Maiwand, Afghanistan, when  enemy forces attacked his unit with  small arms fire.  He was assigned to  the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry  Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat  Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash

Staff Sgt.  Alexander G. Povilaitis, 47, of  Dawsonville, Ga., died May 31, in  Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of  wounds sustained when the enemy  attacked with an improvised explosive  device. Povilaitis was assigned to 14th Engineer Battalion, 555th  Engineer Brigade, Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Lance Cpl.  Joshua E. Witsman, 23, of Covington,  Ind., died May 30 while supporting  combat operations in Helmand  province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to  2nd Battalion, 5th Marine  Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine  Expeditionary Force, Camp  Pendleton, Calif.

Spc. Kedith L. Jacobs, 21, of Denver, Colo, ied May 27, in Chak-E Wardak District, Afghanistan, when their unit was attacked by enemy forces.

Pfc. Leroy Deronde III, 22, Jersey City, New Jersey ied May 27, in Chak-E Wardak District, Afghanistan, when their unit was attacked by enemy forces.

Spc. Jacobs was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters  Company,  2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team,  1st  Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas. Pfc. Deronde was assigned to F  Company, 125th Brigade  Support Battalion attached to 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 3rd  Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Staff Sgt.  Roberto Loeza, 28, of El Paso, Texas,  died May 25 in Charkh, Logar  province, Afghanistan, when enemy forces  attacked his unit with indirect  fire.  He was assigned to the 1st  Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment,  3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas.

*Source: Assembled from Department of Defense news releases

Here are the names of our recent war dead. Please stop and pray  for the families of our fallen warriors.  Remember them. Their mission  is foredoomed by an administration afraid to name the enemy and fight  the war declared on us by the monstrous jihadist enemy. Their  difficulties seem insurmountable — combat for an incoherent and  incomprehensible mission, impossible rules of engagement, repeated  extended overseas deployments — and still they persevere and prevail.  G-d bless the finest fighting force in the world.

May 27th: Hospitalman Eric D. Warren, of Shawnee,  Okla., died May 26 of wounds received in action due to an improvised  explosive device blast in Sangin District, Helmand Province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment,  Regimental Combat Team 6, 1st Marine Division (Forward), I Marine  Expeditionary Force (Forward), Camp Lejeune, N.C.

May 26: Cpl. Keaton G. Coffey, 22, of Boring, Ore.,  died May 24 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 1st Law Enforcement Battalion, 1st  Marine Headquarters Group, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp  Pendleton, Calif.

May 25: Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan J. Wilson, 26,  of Shasta, Calif., died of complications associated with a medical  condition May 20 in Manama, Bahrain.  Wilson was assigned to U.S. Naval  Forces Central Command headquarters in Bahrain.

May 24: 2nd Lt. Travis A. Morgado, 25, of San Jose,  Calif., died May 23 in Zharay, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when  insurgents attacked his patrol with an improvised explosive device.  He  was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker  Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord,  Wash.

Pfc. Cale C. Miller, 23, of Overland Park, Kan, died May 24, in Maiwand, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when enemy  forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device.  He was  assigned to the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker  Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord,  Wash.

May 23: Spc. Arronn D. Fields, 27, of Terre Haute,  Ind., died May 21 in Qal-ah-ye Mirza Jal, Afghanistan, of injuries  suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with rocket propelled  grenades.  He was assigned to the 81st Troop Command, Indiana National  Guard, Indianapolis, Ind.

May 21: Spc. Samuel T. Watts, 20, of Wheaton, Ill.,  died May 19, in Bethesda, Md., of wounds sustained April 25, in Zharay,  Afghanistan, when he was attacked with an enemy improvised explosive  device.               Watts was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 508th  Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne  Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.

May 20,  Capt. Jesse A. Ozbat, 28, of, Prince George, Va., and 2nd Lt. Tobias C. Alexander, 30, of Lawton, Okla. in Tarin Kowt, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered  when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive  device.  They were assigned to the 168th Brigade Support Battalion,  214th Fires Brigade, Fort Sill, Okla.

May 16: Staff Sgt. Israel P. Nuanes, 38, of Las  Cruces, N.M., died May 12, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, of wounds  sustained during an enemy attack with an improvised explosive device.              Nuanes was assigned to 741st Ordnance Company, Fort Bliss,  Texas, part of the 84th Ordnance Battalion, 71st Ordnance Group.

May 14: Spc. Alex Hernandez III, 21, of Round Rock,  Texas, died May 12, in Kandahar, Afghanistan.              Hernandez was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii.

May 13: Sgt. Brian L. Walker, 25, of Lucerne Valley, Calif., and  Pfc. Richard L. McNulty III, 22, Rolla, Mo. were  killed, in Bowri Tana, Afghanistan, when the enemy attacked their  vehicle with an improvised explosive device.  The  soldiers were assigned  to the 425th Brigade Special Troops Battalion,  4th Brigade Combat Team  (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Joint Base  Elmendorf-Richardson,  Alaska.

Sgt. Wade D. Wilson, 22, of Normangee, Texas, died  May 11 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province,  Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

1st Lt. Alejo R. Thompson, 30, of Yuma, Ariz., died  May 11 in Bagram, Afghanistan, when enemy forces attacked his unit with  small-arms fire.  He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry  Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson,  Colo.

May 7 : Sgt. Jacob M. Schwallie, 22, of Clarksville, Tenn, and Spc. Chase S. Marta, 24, of Chico, Calif. and Pfc. Dustin D. Gross, 19, of Jeffersonville, Ky. , in Ghazni province, Afghanistan, of wounds  suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised  explosive device.  They were assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 73rd Cavalry  Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg,  N.C.

2nd Lt. David E. Rylander, 23, of Stow, Ohio.  and Spc. Junot M. L. Cochilus, 34, of Charlotte, N.C.  died May 2 in Logar province, Afghanistan, of  injuries sustained when insurgents attacked their unit with an  improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the 7th Engineer  Battalion, 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum,  N.Y.

Staff Sgt. Thomas K. Fogarty, 30, of Alameda,  Calif., died May 6, in Ahmad-Kheyl, Afghanistan, from injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive  device.  He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division,  Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

May 7: Sgt. John P. Huling, 25, of West Chester,  Ohio, died May 6 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st  Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton,  Calif.               Huling’s death was originally reported by the  International Security Assistance Force, which characterized it as the  result of gunshot wounds inflicted by an individual wearing an Afghan  National Army uniform.               This incident is under  investigation.

Master Sgt. Gregory L. Childs, 38, Warren, Ark.,  died May 4, in Kabul, Afghanistan.               Childs is assigned to  Defense Logistics Agency, Fort Belvoir, Va.

More fallen heroes here.

Posted by on Tuesday, September 11, 2012

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